Non Christmas Music at Christmas

December Playlist Highlights

Song

 

Artist

Category

Origin

Llegue Yo Llegué Yo - Como Gato de Angora Michel Maza Salsa Cuba
Salsa, Timba Y Amor Salsa, Timba y Amor - Supercubano Issac Delgao Salsa Cuba
La Habana Me Llama La Habana Me Llama - Control Manolito y Su Trabuco Salsa Cuba
Deja De Criticar Deja de Criticar - Mi Tumbao Social La Excelencia Salsa New York
Caminando Caminando - Todos Vuelven Live Volume 2 Ruben Blades Salsa Panama
Subelo Alex Wilson Salsaton UK
No Quiero Estar Solo No Quiero Estar Solo - Como Te Olvido Allendy Bachata Dominican Republic
Fantasias Fantasías - Hasta el Fin Monchy & Alexandra Bachata Dominican Republic
Mi Nina Bonita Mi niña bonita - Mi niña bonita Chino y Nacho Merengue Venezuela
Bandolero Bandolero - Top Latino Olga Tañon Merengue Dominican Republic
Damelo Damelo - Caliente Havana Salsa, Vol. 1 Clave Cubana Cha Cha Cha Cuba
Tudu Di Mi Tudu Di Mi (feat. Mika Mendes) - Black Madonna Isah Zouk ?
Gordita Gordita (feat. Residente Calle 13) - Sale el Sol Shakira/Residente Cumbiaton Colombia

 

Who Is?

  • Colombia has a rich musical history and a long line of internationally successful artists from a range of genres. The genre of Salsa is no exception.  Arguably, Colombians have their own style of Salsa music and certainly have their own way of dancing Salsa.  One of the early Colombian Salsa artists, and one of the most successful, is Julio Ernesto Estrada Rincon aka Fruko.  His musical career goes back to the early 70’s when he joined a Cuban influenced band Los Corraleros de Majagual.  After visiting New York and being inspired by the music coming out of the Fania label, Fruko started his own band called Fruko y Sus Tesos.  It was with this band that another famous Colombian singer Joe Arroyo got his start.  The band has an impressive collection of very danceable Salsa songs, their most famous song being El Preso.  Some of my other favourites include El Ausente and Confundido.  If you enjoy Frukos’ music check out La Sonora Dinamita and The Latin Brothers, two other bands the he nurtured to success.  And for some insight into 1970’s Colombian fashion, the cover of the album “Fruko El Grande” is an excellent place to start.

 

What am I Listening to?

  • I was introduced to an awesome CD the other day called Salsa Clandestina published by Music Rough Guides.  The word ‘Salsa’ in the title of the album should be interpreted loosely, at least from a dance perspective. While there are some very danceable songs on the album (Café Con Sangre), there are also some interesting oddities (a medley of “Sympathy for the Devil” and “El Cielo”).  The liner notes are excellent and provide a little history about each band and some background about each song.  The names of the albums where the songs originate are also listed.  What I really like about this album is how it pushes the boundaries of what most people consider to be Salsa music.  In my opinion, Salsa is a constantly evolving genre that draws on a wide range of influences, with artists continuing to experiment and play with the style. This evolution is what makes Salsa so exciting to listening to.

 

Questions, comments, requests? send me an email.

Espero que tengas una Feliz Navidad y año nuevo fantástico

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Can you Bugalú?

November Playlist Highlights

Song

 

Artist

Category

Band/Artist Origin

Aïcha Aïcha - Baloba! Africando Salsa New York / Senegal
La Borrachera La Borrachera - Beginner's Guide To Timba Pupi y Los Que Son Son Salsa Cuba
Fiesta Fiesta (feat. Chicharo, Padrino) - 50 Latin Dance Hits (Salsa, Bachata, Reggaeton and More for a Dancing Summer) DJ Berna Jam Salsa Cuba
Sigo Enamorado Sigo Enamorado - Todo Tiene Su Momento Carlos D’Castro Salsa Puerto Rico
Oiga, Mire, Vea Oiga, Mire, Vea - Su Historia Musical Orquesta Guayacan Salsa Colombia
Meniando la Cola Meniando la Cola - Necesito Mas Sexappeal Salsa Dominican Republic
Shorty Shorty Shorty Shorty - Haciendo Historia (Bonus Version) Xtreme Bachata USA
Me Duele La Cabeza Hector Acosta Bachata Dominican Republic
Como Baila Como Baila - Lo Esencial: Grupo Mania Grupo Mania Merengue Puerto Rico
El Disk Jockey Dijo Wilfredo Vargas Merengue Dominican Republic
Que Rico Boogaloo Que Rico Boogaloo - La-33 LA 33 Boogaloo Colombia
La Colegiala La Colegiala - Latino! Greatest Hits - 56 Latin Top Hits (Original Versions!) Rodolfo y Su Tipica Cumbia Colombia
Bien plus fort que mes mots Bien plus fort que mes mots - Bien plus fort que mes mots Kaysha Kizomba Zaire

 

Who Is?

  • Many genres of modern Latin music have roots in or are heavily influenced by African rhythms.  This is especially true for Cuban music on account of the large African population.  Close to one million Africans were brought the island as slaves and they brought their traditional music with them.  Considering this, it’s no surprise that Latin music has become very popular in many parts of Africa and it makes perfect sense that African and Latin musicians would team up to produce some fantastic Afro-Latin music. In the early 90’s this happened and the result was Africando (‘Africa United’ in Senegalese).  The brainchild of Ibrahim Sylla, Africando brought together African vocalists and New York based salsa musicians.  The membership of the band has changed over the years but their music has continued to be innovative and very danceable.  They have a long list of danceable tracks including Aicha, Betece, and Mopao.

 

What Is?

  • Born in the early 60’s, Latin Boogaloo (Bugalú) was the fusion of Cuban rhythms such as son and mambo with American R&B and soul.  In many ways in was a “pop” genre with its playful lyrics, handclaps, and teen audiences.  It was also very successful in crossing over into the non-Latin crowd as many of the songs were sung in English.  The genre became popular enough that most Latin artists of the time had made a contribution.  However, like most pop genres, its’ popularity was short lived and by the end of the 60’s it had all but died out.  That being said, you may have heard a Boogaloo cover recently without even knowing it.  Tito Nieves’ “I Like it Like That” and Las Sonoras Carruseles’ “Micaela” were originally Boogaloos (both by Pete Rodriguez).  The genre also lives on in Colombia, which is where one of the songs for Novembers’ playlist comes from.  How do you dance a Boogaloo?  In Cali, you might do it like this.  In Saskatoon, like this.  Depending on the speed of the song, Cha Cha steps also work quite well.

 

Questions, comments, requests? send me an email.

Hasta la próxima

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